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Travis Manley


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Saturday, April 11, 2009

High Speed Flash Photography beyond 1/200 sec

Found this great trick on how to get away with shooting faster than 1/200sec with a flash.

Most camera manuals say that the max sync speed when using a flash (the shortest shutter speed you can use and fully expose your cameras sensor) is around 1/200-1/250sec.

Have you ever actually tried shooting faster than 1/200sec with a flash? If you do chances are you will see this black area start to show up on the bottom of your cameras lcd screen (if you are shooting landscape orientation). The faster the shutter speed the more black area.

The trick is to keep this in mind when your shooting and incorporate that into the photo. Maybe you want to darken the foreground a little anyway, or if your really talented you can flip your camera upside down to get a dark gradient in the sky if your shooting outdoors.




Here is a link to the author of this video.
www.digitalprotalk.blogspot.com

2 comments:

  1. Very cool vid - great stuff to know. On wedding images, does it really matter if you use 1/200th vs 1/400th? Especially when the people are standing still most of the time. 1/200th is pretty fast enough for regular old portraits. I can see using this technique more for sports and stuff to freeze action a little more, ya know?

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  2. I think it comes in handy when you are shooting with a flash as a fill or something on a really bright day and maybe you want a shallow depth of field.

    Its just a partial vignette which are pretty popular. All you need to do is darken in the rest of the edges.

    Its too bad you cant just flip your camera sensor upside down rather than flipping your camera. I almost always end up darkening the skies in my photos later in Photoshop.

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